Entering BJJ competitions can be nerve-racking, no matter if it’s your first or your fifteenth. It’s awesome and memorable to participate in one. Whether you win or lose most of your battles — the fun is in the game. Win or lose: you come out generally worn out and ready to share your triumph/downfall.

With entering BJJ competitions — while we all love a bit of jumping into the deep end — we still want you to wear your metaphorical life jacket. So tune in to the following tips for staying afloat in your first comp:

 

KNOW THE RULES AND REGULATIONS

Firstly, if it’s asking for gi, don’t rock up in no-gi. Secondly, make sure you read the rest of the rules. While it’s good not to take things too seriously for comp, you don’t want to arrive unprepared. You should know what’s expected of you. You’re sure to have an easier time getting on with the day with some basic knowledge of the rules and regulations – until you’re battling it out on the mats, of course

 

VISUALISE WINNING BUT ALSO PREPARE FOR BATTLE

Your own self-belief is one of your biggest assets in competition. Competitions are a fantastic way to test your jiu jitsu skills, and will help to further reveal the areas you might be falling short. Take the time to visualise the possibilities of how the day could best turn out — but also keep in mind other visualisations to help you better prepare for battle: How will you manage potential stress? What will your strategy be? How will you handle a loss?

TREAT YOUR BODY LIKE A TEMPLE

Keep yourself hydrated and full of good nutritious food. If you’re training harder for comp, make sure you’re also feeding your body in accordance with this. You want to feel in tip-top shape when you get on the mats, so keeping your body in proper working order should be at the top of your list.

 

RELAX AND ENJOY YOURSELF

Plenty of people bring a bit of anxiety with them to comp — it can be nerve-racking! But, at the end of the day, the world is *…pause for dramatic effect…* bigger than jiu jitsu. BJJ competitions are like exams: some will perform well, others won’t, but there is always going to be room for improvement on the craft. 

  

DON’T FORGET TO WARM UP

You don’t want to injure yourself prematurely. Wake up your muscles before you plunge them into a series of feigned life-or-death situations. It takes less than five minutes to get a good warm up in, and you’ll feel the pay-off a lot more compared to just marching yourself straight into battle. 

Got a tournament coming up soon or thinking about joining one? Feel free to get in contact. We’d love to answer your questions.